Harvest Days at End of Year!

At the end of each school year, Grow Some Good likes to have a fun event where kid get to eat lots of goodies from the garden.  This year, every school is having some type of harvest day.  Chef’s, pizzas, lemonade or whatever the garden has to offer!  Below are the amazing recipes and sharing information from Nicol Bradley, owner of Ono Gelato Kihei, is helping us for 4 days at Kihei Elementary and Lokelani Intermediate. 








Sounds pretty amazing. Just like Ms. Nicol! Nicol is the owner Ono Gelato Kihei and a personal chef passionate about teaching Maui’s Keiki to have fun cooking.

Ono Gelato Kihei just closed their doors at current location and have a new concept opening in Kihei later in year which will feature Ono Gelato. They will also feature multiple frozen dessert options plus bakery and confectionary items.

Watch Facebook for more fun Harvest Day posts and special recipes.

Gnocchi in the Garden

Chef Geno Sarmiento of Nick’s Fishmarket recently visited the gardens to give students a hands-on cooking demonstration.  Together they prepared gnocchi with an herb tomato sauce and pan-seared shrimp. Garden Coordinator Jadda Miller, along with  Chef Geno, take questions from the class.

Chef Geno holds up a cherry tomato, one of the ingredients in making the herb tomato sauce. He showed the students how to roll and then cut the dough used to make gnocchi, an Italian dumpling.

          

Students had fun!

“I like rolling the dough.”  “I like cutting the dough.”  “I like eating the gnocchi!”

        

Chef Geno and Tri-Star Restaurant Group

This garden cooking demonstration was put on by Chef Geno Sarmiento, Executive Chef, and the team at Tri-Star Restaurant Group, which manages Nick’s Fishmarket inside Fairmont Kea Lani, Sarento’s on the Beach on Keawakapu Beach, Manoli’s Pizza Company in Wailea, and Son’z Steakhouse inside Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa in Kaanapali.  Mahalo to the entire team for supporting this fun cooking demonstration event for our students.

A Special Mahalo to our  Photographer

Bjarne Salen, of Endless Flow Films, spent two days in the gardens with the students, Garden Coordinator Jadda Miller, and Chef Geno and his team, documenting the cooking demonstrations. Mahalo Bjarne, for donating your time and talent to create wonderful photos of this fun and memorable experience for our students.

How to Make Gnocchi?

Chef Geno generously shared his recipe with us:

Cheese gnocchi (dumplings):  Mix 1 pound of goat cheese and 1 pound of ricotta cheese until evenly combined. Then mix-in 1 cup of flour until the dough is soft. On a floured surface, divide dough into 4 even pieces and roll into 1/2 inch-thick “ropes”. Cut into 1-inch pieces. Cook dumplings in salted boiling water until they float to the surface, about 1 to 2 minutes, blanch cooked gnocchi into ice water, then drain.
Tomato Pesto Sauce: In a food processor, puree garden tomatoes and a handful of garden basil with parmesan cheese (and toasted pine nuts if preferred). The amount of tomatoes, basil and cheese is up to your liking. If you prefer more tomatoes, add more tomatoes or vice versa. Put into a saucepan and bring to a simmer mixing often so as not to burn the sauce. Add gnocchi until heated thoroughly.
Adding protein: Feel free to add protein (shrimp, chicken, etc) or any other vegetables (mushrooms, asparagus, etc) in your dish. Simply sautée in a separate pan and once cooked, add to the sauce and serve with cheese gnocchi topped with grated parmesan cheese.

 

Harvest Festival Fun for Keiki Farmers

Harvest Festival Fun

Keiki farmers at Kamalii Elementary School and Kihei Elementary School enjoyed a fun Harvest Festival at each of their schools. These annual events are a highlight of the school garden program, as students make and enjoy healthy snacks with fresh produce, from recipes designed to be simple, so they can be easily duplicated at home.

Chef Kevin Laut from Outrigger Pizza Company brought his portable pizza oven to Kamalii Elementary School to cook up some quick pies with the assistance of Makena Golf & Beach Club’s Executive Chef Chris Kulis. See more pictures on the Makena Golf & Beach blog.

Outrigger Pizza Company Chef Kevin Laut assists in preparing the pizzas. PC: Matthew Thayer, the Maui News.
Makena Golf & Beach Resort Executive Chef Chris Kulis helps with spreading pizza sause. PC: Makena Golf & Beach Club.
Makena Golf & Beach Resort Community Engagement Manager Leahi Hall visits with keiki. PC: Makena Golf & Beach Resort
Chefs and keiki enjoyed a wonderful morning making pizza and fresh-squeezed lemonade. PC: Makena Golf & Beach Club.

At Kihei Elementary School, Chef Travis Morrin from Fork & Salad and Three’s Bar & Grill came by to assist students with making tortilla-veggie pizzas on the grill. The results were ono-licious! See Chef Travis’ fun interview with the keiki.

Chef Travis Morrin PC: Kiaora Bohlool.
Kihei Elementary School kids enjoy the product of their work – veggie pizzas!
Chef Travis Morrin and Garden Coordinator Nadine Rasmussen.

 

Mahalo!

Thank you to the wonderful chefs who made time to come our to visit with our students!

Chef Chris Kulis, Makena Golf & Beach Club

Chef Kevin Laut, The Outrigger Pizza Company

Chef Travis Morrin, Fork & Salad and Three’s Bar & Grill

And thank you to The Maui News for this front-page piece!

 

Visiting Volunteers help move some soil.

Volunteers Get it Done!

Hundreds of Helpers

We’re thankful for the hundreds of volunteers that support our organization each year. Some come from thousands of miles away and dedicate part of their vacation to helping our community; others live just around the corner and volunteer every month.

Volunteer Highlights from 2016

From painting signs to pulling weeds to assembling planting beds, our volunteers are always willing to help in every way needed. Here are some highlights from 2016.

Pulling weeds in the kalo patch is part of the fun at Kihei Elementary School.
Pulling weeds in the kalo patch is part of the fun at Kihei Elementary School.
Visiting Volunteers make soil sifters.
Visiting Volunteers make soil sifters.
Volunteers at Kihei Charter School move tubes of irrigation line.
Volunteers at Kihei Charter School move tubes of irrigation line.
Volunteers at Kahului Elementary School prepare the soil for planting.
Volunteers at Kahului Elementary School prepare the soil for planting.
Connie ties string around the ipu to prepare it for hanging.
Volunteer Connie ties string around the ipu to prepare it for hanging.
Two student volunteers hang ipu to dry.
Two student volunteers hang ipu to dry.
Visiting Volunteers help move some soil.
Volunteers on Vacation help move some soil at Lokelani Intermediate School.
Prepping veggies for a Harvest Party at Kamali'i Elementary School.
Prepping veggies for a Harvest Party at Kamali’i Elementary School.
Volunteers put the framework in place for new growing beds at Kahului Elementary School.
Volunteers put the framework in place for growing beds at Kahului Elementary School.
Keiki volunteers add soil amendments at Kahului Elementary School.
Keiki volunteers add soil amendments at Kahului Elementary School.
Look what I found while fulling weeds!
Look what I found while pulling weeds!
Volunteer@GrowSomeGood.org
Putting in pretty new raised beds at Pu’u Kukui Elementary School.
Pretty New Growing beds in place at Pu'u Kukui Elementary School.
Pu’u Kukui Elementary School garden looks amazing after a recent Work & Learn Day!
Two of our favorite volunteers - Executive Director Kathy Becklin and Garden Coordinator Nadine Rasmussen.
Two of our favorite volunteers – Executive Director Kathy Becklin (R) and Kihei School Garden Coordinator Nadine Rasmussen (L) help out at Lokelani Intermediate School.

A very special mahalo to all of our wonderful volunteers!

If you are interested in volunteering with Grow Some Good, contact Cynthia at Volunteer@GrowSomeGood.org for more information.

 

Juicing Kō for Lilikoi Lemonade!

IMG_8101Today we harvested two varieties of heirloom Kō sugar cane, talked story about canoe plants brought by the earliest Hawaiian settlers, and used a hand crank cane juicer to make lilikoi lemonade with K-5 grade students during Maui Family YMCA A+ after school program – part of a monthly healthy garden-based recipe series.

Did you know…? Raw cane juice contains only about fifteen percent total sugar content, all of which is in a raw unrefined form. The rest of the juice consists of water brimming with an abundance of vitamins and minerals. Freshly extracted cane juice – like other fresh juices – contain live enzymes and nutrients that are easily absorbed by the body for quick nourishment.IMG_8103

Special thanks to Andy from Maui Cane Juice for helping us make this a special day for our keiki! Look for Maui Cane Juice every Saturday morning at the Maui Swap Meet and Kihei Town 4th Fridays. So ono!

For more pictures, visit Grow Some Good on Facebook.

Chefs + Garden + Kids = Inspiring Maui School Garden Video!

This video by Emmy winning photographer Jess Craven tells the story of Grow Some Good and their work with a Maui school garden that has grown from 3 box beds to nearly a quarter acre edible schoolyard and learning lab in the heart of campus. This is an edited version of the original segment, which aired on Jess’ show “Self Made in Hawaii.”

Kihei Elementary School garden – located in Kihei, Maui, Hawaii – serves as a palate for more than 850 students to grow, harvest and taste their creations while supporting curriculum taught in the classroom. Local chefs also support the garden through fundraisers, recipe workshops and harvest parties. The story shows how kids get excited about eating fresh fruits and vegetables when they grow it and prepare it themselves. Kihei Elementary School garden is an ongoing project of Grow Some Good.

Grow Some Good: Kihei Elementary School Garden with Chefs from Grow Some Good on Vimeo.

Thanks to Jess Craven for his amazing work on this video!

Work & Learn Day This Sat. | Bokashi Compost Workshop

Join us this Saturday morning for “Second Saturday” at Kihei Elementary School Garden as we prepare for summertime cover cropping and soil building.

jenna leilani tallman maui bokashiGrow Some Good is pleased to host a special workshop with Jenna Leilani Tallman of Maui Bokashi. Jenna will teach attendees how to easily turn kitchen scraps into nutrient rich garden compost with a centuries-old Japanese farming method using Bokashi.

During this hands-on session, Jenna will demonstrate how to combine EM1 (stands for effective micro-organisms) with a carbon base (e.g. sawdust or bran) and a sugar for food (e.g. molasses). The mixture, called Bokashi, is layered with food waste in a sealed container and after a few weeks, removed and buried in compost to accelerate odor-free decomposition and boost nutrient availability for plants.

Bokashi Workshop is free for garden care volunteers. $10 suggested donation for guests attending workshop only (to cover material costs). 50% donated to Kihei Elementary School Garden. Garden care and workshop participants will also receive a free 5 lb. bag of Sustane organic all-purpose fertilizer, complements of Grow Some Good.

“Second Saturday”

Saturday, May 11

8:30 a.m. Garden Care
11:30 a.m. Bokashi Compost Workshop
Where:
Kihei Elementary School
250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

“Third Thursday”
Thursday, May 16
2 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Where:
Kihei Elementary School
250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

Join us for all or part of the day. Water and light refreshments will be provided. If you have questions in advance, please email info@GrowSomeGood.org, call 808.269.6300 or visit our Volunteer Page. See you there!

SOS: Saving Our Seeds for a Sustainable Future

Seed Saving

In the final months of school, garden lessons turn to a continuation of the life cycle with ‘Saving Our Seeds’ workshops at all grade levels. This exercise connects students to sustainable practices that preserve their favorite plants, ensure food security and support benchmarks in science (life cycle), social studies (food economics) and more.

During hands-on lessons, students dig into discussions and activities that illustrate stages of the life cycles (germination/birth, growth, reproduction, and death) of various plants and animals, pointing out details that distinguish each stage. Students also learn the value of seed saving and how it affects food availability for the future. As our jr. gardeners/scientists/economists become more experienced, the learning possibilities are endless. Here are just a few ideas to get started:

Discussion Points

  • Where can you find seeds in the garden? In a flower? In a fruit? In a dried pod?
  • At which point of the life cycle is a seed? The beginning or the end? Answer: Both! Discuss when a seed is at the end (in flower, fruit or seed pod) and when a seed is at the beginning (when planted and watered) of the life cycle.
  • Why save seeds? Discuss the value of preserving genes from healthy plants, saving money, food security, etc.
  • How does age / storage affect germination rates? Review germination, discuss how seeds lose their ability to germinate over time or under poor storage conditions (heat, moisture, oxidation, etc).Seed Saving

Activities

  • Students divide into groups to search for seeds throughout the garden and collect with volunteer and/or teacher supervision.
  • Seeds can be compared by weight, shape, color, texture, etc.
  • Demonstrate different ways seeds travel – by wind (lettuce seeds with feathers fly in the wind), wing (birds eating from a plate of sunflower seeds), water (place a seeding flower or open seed pod on a mound, simulate rain with watering can to watch a seeds travel in the water stream and replant itself downstream).
  • Seeds are sorted, categorized, bagged or jarred, and labeled with collection dates.
  • Seeds are then stored in a cool, dry, airtight place for use in next year’s school garden and/or planted in starts containers for students to add to their summer home gardens.

Seed SavingCheck out more ideas for all grades and experience levels in this free e-book download made available by the Occidental Arts & Ecology Center.

World Class Chefs + 1,000 Students Celebrate School Garden Harvest Fest

kihei elementary school students prepare stir fry ingredients with garden grown veggies For three full days, April 24-26, world-class chefs led garden recipe workshops with more than 950 students in nearly a quarter-acre of garden space in the heart of the Kihei Elementary School campus. Kindergarten through 5th grade students and chefs prepared Asian stir-fry and gourmet veggie pizzas using ingredients grown and harvested from the school’s Pizza Garden and Gardens of the World. Students chopped, peeled and spiced their garden delights before chefs tossed them into a giant wok and wood-fired pizza oven and served it up in a pop-up café to celebrate the school’s annual Harvest Fest.

Private Maui Chef Dan Fiske and Capische? Chef de Cuisine Christopher Kulis assist Kihei Elementary School students in preparing garden-grown ingredients for a stir fry recipeNow in its sixth year, Kihei Elementary School garden, managed by Grow Some Good, has become a model program for integrating sustainability and nutrition into curriculum while inspiring future farmers, chefs, scientists, teachers and entrepreneurs on Maui. “We have observed children who are shy or those who don’t do well in the classroom, blossom just like the plants they are cultivating,” says Halle Maxwell, Kihei Elementary School Principal.

Grow Some Good is a nonprofit community program dedicated to creating hands-on, outdoor learning experiences that cultivate curiosity about natural life cycles, connect students to their food sources, and inspire better nutrition choices. In addition to helping establish food gardens and living science labs in local schools, the organization provides resources and curriculum support through community partnerships in agriculture, science, food education and nutrition. For more information about Grow Some Good, visit GrowSomeGood.org.Private chef Jana McMahon assists Kihei Elementary School students in creating school garden veggie pizzas

MAHALO TO OUR CHEFS!

MAHALO to Elyse Ditzel of Whole Foods Market Kahului for donating extra local produce to the Harvest Fest!

And, as always, MAHALO TO OUR WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS who make these special events run smoothly and inspire greater nutrition for our keiki!

– Nio Kindla, Terry Huth, Kathy Becklin, Dania Katz, Eric Ulman, Ray and Laura Van Wagner, Connie Mark, Jordan Lauren Claymore, Wyatt Gouveia, Anthony LaBua, Sierra Knight and Ruby Ayers… you are AWESOME! We couldn’t do this without you!

Math Matters in the Garden

Measuring Perimeter, Area & Volume / Inspiring Entrepreneurial Minds 

This week, third and fourth graders at Kihei Elementary School and Wailuku Elementary School practiced measuring perimeter, area and volume in the garden to determine quantities of soil and lumber required to build a new raised garden bed and design garden layouts.

The measurements were also used to determine how many plants could be planted in the surface area of the new bed and how a farmer would use these math skills to determine what price to charge for produce.

Lots of fun and a great way to inspire entrepreneurial skills at an early age!

Here’s a link to Kids Gardening resources on a variety of math lessons to incorporate into your school garden programs.