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Harvest Festivals – What Students Taught Us

Amazing Dishes

 

Harvest Festivals are year-end activities that allow students to enjoy the fruits of their labor. This year, volunteer Chefs from DUO in the Four Seasons Wailea, Outrigger Pizza Company and Ono Gelato came out to share their skills with students in the garden. Quesadillas, harvest fresh salsa, smoothies, steamed kalo (taro), herb salad, rosemary and lavender lemonade, and ratatouille served on a kalo and ‘ulu (breadfruit) pancake, were some of the fun and unique garden-inspired dishes that the chefs shared. Find some of these recipes here.

Tasting Something New

While students were eager to try the dishes made from ingredients from their gardens, they hesitated on some of the more unique items. At Kihei Elementary School, many had never tried ratatouille before. To encourage students to try it, we started having them be part of the assembly process. Each student got a piece of pancake, and served their own ratatouille, as much, or as little as they wanted, over the pancake. This simple bit of engagement made them feel like they were part of creating the dish, and they were less intimidated to try it. When they did, they loved it!

Similarly, at Pomaika ‘i Elementary School in Kahului, the first class of students to participate in the Harvest Festival was hesitant to try the kalo (taro), with only about 10% tasting it. For the second class, teachers asked students to serve it to their classmates. With this small change, participation in the tasting skyrocketed, with over 80% of students tasting the kalo.

Meanwhile, at Kamali’i Elementary School in Kihei, students loaded on the veggies without hesitation when it was their turn to make quesadillas. Did having a hand in creating their meal make a difference? We think so.

Lesson Learned

In the end, teachers, chefs, and garden coordinators saw the importance of having students involved in the food preparation and serving process.  By having them try a dish they had served themselves, or having the encouragement of their classmates, students weren’t as fearful to try something new. They enjoyed their schools’ Harvest Festival events as a way to taste new foods and celebrate the ending of a successful school year.

Parents and caregivers can also learn from this experience. Having your child select produce from a local farmer’s market is the first step. Letting them help prepare the dish, and then serve it to family members, can have a big impact and get the whole family to try eating healthier foods.

Bon appetit!

Annual School Garden Survey Results

As the 2017-18 school year came to a close, Grow Some Good conducted its annual School Garden Survey of teachers and principals. Results of both surveys showed that school garden programs make a significant impact with students and are changing the faces of our school campuses.

Teachers’ School Garden Survey Results

The following tables highlight some of the most significant results that came from about 120 teachers who participate in our program. Results come from grade K-8 and across 10 schools.


Teachers Share Observations Regarding Students’ Activities and Learning.

Teachers in Grow Some Good Programs Report Major Changes in Student Learning as shown in 2018 School Garden Survey

Garden Lessons Extend Beyond Planting & Harvesting

Garden teaching enhances key curriculum as shown in 2018 School Garden Survey

Teacher Comments

“I think Garden is something we ALL look forward to.  The students love being outside and learning in a hands-on environment about things they genuinely find interesting.”


There are some children who struggle with academic learning but excel with the hands-on experience of the garden – this is an important part of their education.


“Students really enjoyed going to the garden and learning about the plants, growing plants, harvesting, observing the cycles of nature, learning about insects, composting, taking care of the plants, and much more!  Such a positive experience!”


“The students love garden days!”

Principals’ School Garden Survey Results

Principals agreed that the gardens make a positive impact on their school campuses.

100% of principals agreed that Garden:

  • Provides additional educational resources for teachers
  • Has added to the beautification of the campus
  • Students have a sense of pride about their school garden.

Principals Also Said…

“The garden adds so much to our school culture and promotes a sense of pride on our campus.”

“Our garden coordinator is awesome, dedicated and makes things happen.”

“It was great this year!”

Harvest Days at End of Year!

At the end of each school year, Grow Some Good likes to have a fun event where kid get to eat lots of goodies from the garden.  This year, every school is having some type of harvest day.  Chef’s, pizzas, lemonade or whatever the garden has to offer!  Below are the amazing recipes and sharing information from Nicol Bradley, owner of Ono Gelato Kihei, is helping us for 4 days at Kihei Elementary and Lokelani Intermediate. 








Sounds pretty amazing. Just like Ms. Nicol! Nicol is the owner Ono Gelato Kihei and a personal chef passionate about teaching Maui’s Keiki to have fun cooking.

Ono Gelato Kihei just closed their doors at current location and have a new concept opening in Kihei later in year which will feature Ono Gelato. They will also feature multiple frozen dessert options plus bakery and confectionary items.

Watch Facebook for more fun Harvest Day posts and special recipes.

Delicious Food & Great Fun at Taste of School Gardens

Friends of Grow Some Good Show Their Support

Saturday, March 10th, friends and supporters of Grow Some Good gathered to celebrate the 6th Annual Taste of School Gardens event, held at Maui Tropical Plantation. Guests enjoyed wonderful garden-inspired dishes, with fine wines, local brews, and music by the Deborah Vial Band. The event raised over $50,000 for our school garden programs.

“Zero Waste” Results

With the help of Maui Huliau Foundation Green Events program, we were able to reduce the amount of waste generated from the event that ended up in a landfill to just 7%, while 71% of waste was compostable, and 22% recycled.   

Gardens Change Lives

See how the kids enjoy the garden with our video, “Gardens Change Lives,” created in partnership with the Mālamalama Maui Project and Kilinahe Media.

 

Mahalo to all of our sponsors, restaurant partners, vendors, volunteers, and donors who helped make this a very special night.

 

                

                                                                  

Photo Credits: Mieko Photography

“Zero Waste” at Taste of School Gardens

Goals for the Environment

Grow Some Good cares deeply about our island environment, and it has long been a goal of ours to reduce the amount of waste generated at the annual Taste of School Gardens event. Through our partnership with the Maui Huliau Foundation Green Events program, and our event hosts at Maui Tropical Plantation, this year we hope to meet this goal and minimize the waste that goes to landfills.

What is “Zero-Waste?”

This year we’re excited to present a “zero-waste” event as part of our eco-plan for Taste of School Gardens. What does that mean? Can any event really be “zero-waste?”

Maybe not completely, but we can get close! Zero-waste stations throughout the event will have separate receptacles for food waste and recyclable material, diverting 65-86% of waste from landfills.  Each station has bins, educational signs and volunteers to ensure that items are disposed of properly. These waste stations become educational opportunities to share the importance of the tenants of reduce, reuse, and recycle, and demonstrate how simple it can be.

The use of compostable serving dishes, forks, and spoons, generously donated by Sustainable Island Products, will help reduce waste further. As gardeners, we know the value of composting and creating rich, vibrant soil, and we’re excited about using compostable materials.  We’re also encouraging guests to reuse their glassware, and providing rinse stations for glasses at the wine tents.

Mahalo to our partners in creating a zero-waste event at this year’s Taste of School Gardens.

 

Mahalo to Our Taste of School Gardens Sponsors

 

Taste of School Gardens 2018

Mahalo Nui Loa to Our Sponsors!

Taste of School Gardens at Maui Tropical Plantation

Taste of School Gardens took place Saturday, March 10th at the Maui Tropical Plantation Grand View Lawn. We’re grateful to our event hosts, Maui Tropical Plantation, for providing this venue surrounded by lush farmland, and with a breathtaking view of the Waikapu Valley.

Some of Maui’s best chefs served up delicious dishes inspired by school gardens. Mahalo for your support!

 

 

 

 

Featured Chefs and Restaurants:Photo of sample dish from Taste of School Gardens

 

Cheers!

Mahalo to our special fine wine and beer vendors:

Chambers & Chambers Wine Merchants

Johnson Brothers of Hawaii

Paradise Beverages

Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits

Maui Brewing Company

 

Entertainment By the Deborah Vial Band 

Mahalo to Maui singer Deborah Vial for sharing your great vocal talent at this event.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to our sponsors for lending their support and expertise to make this event a success!

Bradley Mason

Garden Coordinator

Lahaina Intermediate and Princess Nahi’ena’ena Elementary School

Bradley Mason

Bradley was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois and moved to West Maui in July of 2010. The son of a teacher and coach, education and athletics have been a part of his life since his youth. He was an elite swimmer and water polo player in Illinois, so moving to an island home was a natural fit. He graduated from Northeastern Illinois University with a major in Education and a minor in Math and Science Concepts for Middle School Instruction. This is his seventh year in education in West Maui having taught science at both Sacred Hearts School and Lahainaluna High School. This is his seventh season as the Head Coach of the Lahainaluna Water Polo team having earned MIL Coach of the Year recognition in 2013, 2014, and 2015.

His passion for organic gardening/farming, local food security and incorporating health and wellness into education began while at Sacred Hearts, where he created his first organic school garden. He was trained by the Ku Aina Pa School Garden Teacher Training Program based in Waimea, Hawaii and also at the Farm as School, Food as Medicine Institute, a biodynamic farm in Pauuilo, Hawaii. Bradley is excited to a part of the Grow Some Good family and continuing the important work of teaching West Maui students about growing food and establishing lifelong healthy habits.

Cynthia Cordova

Pu’u Kukui Elementary School and Waihe’e Elementary School

Cynthia Cordova

Cynthia has BA Degrees in Agriculture, Food and Sustainability and in Sustainable Agriculture and Food Production. She started with Grow Some Good in 2016.

Cynthia says:

My goal for the gardens this year is to grow more, harvest more, and share more.

What I’m really looking forward to: Teaching in the shade structure that was built over the summer at Pu’u Kukui. When it rains or when it’s really hot the students now have a place to sit and take a break.

My favorite thing about working with kids is: teaching them the power of growth and watching them grow with their plants.

I’m looking forward to becoming a coordinator for a new school. I’m excited to meet the new community at Waihe’e and grow together.

My favorite thing about gardens is: how it creates a sense of community. It brings people together to work for a greater good.

My favorite fruits that grow on Maui are lilikoi and mango.

Kat Powers

Garden Coordinator

Kathy Powers

Kahului Elementary School & Wailuku Elementary School

Kat has 25+ years as professional landscape designer & contractor.  She has taken courses in landscape design, irrigation, native plant identification & small business practices. Kat is currently working on an Aromatherapy Certificate. Kat also serves as part-time Farm Manager for Grow Some Good.

Kat says:

My goal for my gardens this year is to provide a functional, healthy, fun & safe garden learning experience.

What I’m really looking forward to:  working with the kieki and getting to know the school communities.

My favorite thing about working with kids is: watching them thrive, laugh and learn!

My favorite thing about gardens is: being a part of all that grows.

My favorite fruit or vegetable that grows on Maui is breadfruit.

and

I have so much appreciation for this opportunity to work in the school gardens.

Malia Bohlin

Development Director

Malia Bohlin

Malia has a BS in Mass Communications and Journalism, and a Master’s degree in Non Profit Management. She has over 20 years of fundraising experience, and started with Grow Some Good in 2015.

Malia says:

My goal for the school gardens this year is to keep them well-funded, with adequate supplies, staff time and materials, in order to optimize the fun, curiosity and learning in our outdoor classrooms.

I’m really looking forward to: the enhancement of our current lessons to align even more closely with curriculum standards, to better support teachers and have even more significant learning outcomes for students.

My favorite thing about working with kids is: their willingness to try new things.

My favorite thing about gardens is: witnessing the magic of growing things. From a small seed, to a sprout, a plant, a tree, and then harvesting buckets of fruit. Simply amazing.

My favorite fruit or vegetable that grows on Maui: it’s a tie between lilikoi and lychee. Ok, lilikoi.