March 8 Gala: Taste of School Gardens

Migrant_smedia_FBMarch 8: Taste of School Gardens

hwsunset-newsletter
Photography: Peter Liu

Grow Some Good school garden programs are planting seeds for Mauiʻs next generation of farmers, chefs, teachers, scientists and entrepreneurs.

Local chefs and school garden supporters will celebrate all the good things growing for more than 2,500 students in South and Central Maui school garden programs at the 2nd Annual Grow Some Good:  Taste of School Gardens event.

Hotel Waileaʻs Sunset Lawn will host this special sunset event serving gourmet dishes prepared from local and school garden-grown ingredients by Mauiʻs top chefs, including:

Lots of vegetarian options available. CLICK HERE for Menu and list of 27 fine wines and local brews included in your ticket price.

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BrownChicken BrownCow String Band

Music by BrownChicken BrownCow String Band and Master of Ceremonies Dean Wong (Exec. Director of Imua Family Services), and amazing live and silent auction (AUCTION PREVIEW LINK) and a gorgeous sunset view greets this gathering of ʻohana, growing a bountiful future on Maui.

Saturday, March 8, 2014
5:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Hotel Wailea
555 Kaukahi Street
Wailea, HI 96753
Parking Note:
Guest parking is located in the large grassy lot on the corner of Wailea Ike Drive and Kalai Waa Drive. Shuttles will be running regularly from the parking lot to Hotel Wailea from 2 p.m. to 9:15 p.m.  See the map below for details. Guests who park on Kaukahi Street may be ticketed by the Maui County Police. Parking_for_GSG_Event

 

Advance Tickets:
$89 per person
$850 table of 10*

$99 per person at the door

All guests must be 21+ to attend this event.

NOTICE: ADVANCE TICKETS ARE SOLD OUT, BUT $99 TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR. WE HAVE A BIG BEAUTIFUL TENT IN CASE WE GET SOME SPRINKLES, BUT FORECAST LOOKS CLEAR FOR EVENT TIME. SEE YOU THERE!

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Mahalo Nui Loa to Our Sponsors

  Maui-Time-Weekly-logo-small       themkt_logotype_blk  PrivateMauiChefgoldOUTLINE     Cafe Carmen_Logo_0907 Fabiani's Wailea Logo CMYK-1   Hawaiianmoonslogosurftruck Alaska-Airlines-Logo

Special thanks to:

Tri-Isle Resource Conservation & Development Council
Mulligan’s on the Blue
Maui Culinary Academy

… And every wonderful teacher, parent, volunteer and local business that digs in to help school gardens on Maui thrive!

New Garden Sprouts at Kahului Elementary

A new edible classroom at Kahului Elementary School has sprouted from the passion, enthusiasm and collaboration of an awe-inspiring group of educators and volunteers. First grade teachers attended a recent school garden tour and turned their inspiration into action. The whole grade level is applying outdoor learning as part of their new curriculum-based school garden program.

Together we created soil nutrient building systems in each bed – while talking about lessons on carbon, nitrogen, decomposers and microorganisms. The awesome garden dig-in ended with a community picnic under the shade trees, talking story and appreciating all the good things growing.

Mahalo nui loa to Maui School Garden Network, Hui Malama Learning Center, ISI Irrigation, Ace Hardware and all the volunteers, students and families who are partnering with Grow Some Good to create an amazing gift of growth and prosperity for keiki and community. Check out more photos on in our Facebook album.

Wailuku Elementary Gardeners Share Cinco de Mayo Recipes

Mas de 100 estudiantes participating in tutoring and enrichment programs at Wailuku Elementary School celebrated Cinco de Mayo by harvesting produce from their Salsa & Green Smoothie Gardens and sharing recipes during an after-school fiesta! Wailuku Elementary School garden program is supported through a partnership between 21st Century Learning Centers Baldwin Complex and Grow Some Good. The Harvest Fiesta included jr. gardeners preparing papaya and pineapple salsa, guacamole and green smoothies, using school garden-grown ingredients.wailuku fest3

Students also learned about the historical significance of the holiday when Mexico defeated the French during a battle where they were outnumbered by double the soldiers, then related it to the tenacity of their healthy plants when attacked by pests in the garden. Green smoothies were served up with a review of what makes plants green, covering curriculum such as photosynthesis, chlorophyll and the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.
wailuku elementary school cinco de mayo maui hawaii school garden
Mariachi music underscored the fiesta finale as blindfolded contestants took turns whacking at a piñata filled with fruit juice-sweetened treats, almonds and other surprises.

Special thanks to Tim Ewing and ohana at Hawaiian Moons Natural Foods for donating extra local produce, organic corn chips and apple juice to the Harvest Feista! tim ewing hawaiian moons natural foods kihei maui hawaii

Our Salsa Party RecipesGarden Salsa (Serves about 50-100 jr. gardeners and volunteers. Here are some ideas on integrating each step into hands-on learning, so students are the chefs!)

  • 1 – fresh papaya (students spoon out seeds to clean and dry for planting new starts)
  • 1 fresh chopped pineapple (save top for new planting – here’s how to grow in a container at home or school)
  • 1.5 quarts – a medium sized bowl of fresh picked tomatoes (have students chop tomatoes to measure quarts or compare to conversions in ounces or pounds with scale)
  • 4-6 chopped or sliced carrots (students chop carrots with plastic serrated knives or widdle a whole carrot to thin slices with a veggie peeler.
  • 1/2 Hawaiian hot pepper or Anaheim pepper (students with non-latex gloves slice with plastic serrated knife and remove seeds.) You may choose to leave this ingredient out with younger students who have sensitive taste buds.
  • 1 clove garlic (students peel garlic with gloves or use garlic press) Again, you may also choose to leave this ingredient out with younger students or roast the garlic in advance to bring out sweeter flavors.
  • 1.5 tsp sea salt (salt to taste)
  • 1 cup or approx 250 ml of fresh squeezed Myer lemon juice (students slice lemons in half, hand squeeze and compare milliliters to cups when measuring)
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped (students can use onion chopper)
  • 2 green onions finely chopped (the whole onion – green tops and white onions. Students can tear onion tops with gloves in tiny pieces or use scissors)
  • 2 cups fresh cilantro (how much does it weigh in ounces? Make predictions, check weight to compare with predictions)

Directions: Combine  first 8 ingredients in equal parts (half at a time) in a food processor or blender, then pulse until fine or chunky consistency. Add finely chopped green onions and cilantro.

Guacamole

  • 6 ripe avocados mashed in a bowl with potato masher, then add 2 cups salsa (recipe above), a little extra sea salt to taste.

Have several students taste test, make any adjustments to the recipe based on your jr. chefs’ recommendations. Then, serve with organic, non-GMO corn chips or substitute corn chips for black bean chips or another healthy crunchy alternative from the local health food store.  You can even wrap all the ingredients with sliced veggies in a kale leaf for a garden veggie burrito.  We’ve found that as long as you call it a burrito – they’ll at least try it and most likely love it!

Check out our green smoothie recipe on the Grow Some Good website.  Aloha & Salud Amigos!

SOS: Saving Our Seeds for a Sustainable Future

Seed Saving

In the final months of school, garden lessons turn to a continuation of the life cycle with ‘Saving Our Seeds’ workshops at all grade levels. This exercise connects students to sustainable practices that preserve their favorite plants, ensure food security and support benchmarks in science (life cycle), social studies (food economics) and more.

During hands-on lessons, students dig into discussions and activities that illustrate stages of the life cycles (germination/birth, growth, reproduction, and death) of various plants and animals, pointing out details that distinguish each stage. Students also learn the value of seed saving and how it affects food availability for the future. As our jr. gardeners/scientists/economists become more experienced, the learning possibilities are endless. Here are just a few ideas to get started:

Discussion Points

  • Where can you find seeds in the garden? In a flower? In a fruit? In a dried pod?
  • At which point of the life cycle is a seed? The beginning or the end? Answer: Both! Discuss when a seed is at the end (in flower, fruit or seed pod) and when a seed is at the beginning (when planted and watered) of the life cycle.
  • Why save seeds? Discuss the value of preserving genes from healthy plants, saving money, food security, etc.
  • How does age / storage affect germination rates? Review germination, discuss how seeds lose their ability to germinate over time or under poor storage conditions (heat, moisture, oxidation, etc).Seed Saving

Activities

  • Students divide into groups to search for seeds throughout the garden and collect with volunteer and/or teacher supervision.
  • Seeds can be compared by weight, shape, color, texture, etc.
  • Demonstrate different ways seeds travel – by wind (lettuce seeds with feathers fly in the wind), wing (birds eating from a plate of sunflower seeds), water (place a seeding flower or open seed pod on a mound, simulate rain with watering can to watch a seeds travel in the water stream and replant itself downstream).
  • Seeds are sorted, categorized, bagged or jarred, and labeled with collection dates.
  • Seeds are then stored in a cool, dry, airtight place for use in next year’s school garden and/or planted in starts containers for students to add to their summer home gardens.

Seed SavingCheck out more ideas for all grades and experience levels in this free e-book download made available by the Occidental Arts & Ecology Center.

World Class Chefs + 1,000 Students Celebrate School Garden Harvest Fest

kihei elementary school students prepare stir fry ingredients with garden grown veggies For three full days, April 24-26, world-class chefs led garden recipe workshops with more than 950 students in nearly a quarter-acre of garden space in the heart of the Kihei Elementary School campus. Kindergarten through 5th grade students and chefs prepared Asian stir-fry and gourmet veggie pizzas using ingredients grown and harvested from the school’s Pizza Garden and Gardens of the World. Students chopped, peeled and spiced their garden delights before chefs tossed them into a giant wok and wood-fired pizza oven and served it up in a pop-up café to celebrate the school’s annual Harvest Fest.

Private Maui Chef Dan Fiske and Capische? Chef de Cuisine Christopher Kulis assist Kihei Elementary School students in preparing garden-grown ingredients for a stir fry recipeNow in its sixth year, Kihei Elementary School garden, managed by Grow Some Good, has become a model program for integrating sustainability and nutrition into curriculum while inspiring future farmers, chefs, scientists, teachers and entrepreneurs on Maui. “We have observed children who are shy or those who don’t do well in the classroom, blossom just like the plants they are cultivating,” says Halle Maxwell, Kihei Elementary School Principal.

Grow Some Good is a nonprofit community program dedicated to creating hands-on, outdoor learning experiences that cultivate curiosity about natural life cycles, connect students to their food sources, and inspire better nutrition choices. In addition to helping establish food gardens and living science labs in local schools, the organization provides resources and curriculum support through community partnerships in agriculture, science, food education and nutrition. For more information about Grow Some Good, visit GrowSomeGood.org.Private chef Jana McMahon assists Kihei Elementary School students in creating school garden veggie pizzas

MAHALO TO OUR CHEFS!

MAHALO to Elyse Ditzel of Whole Foods Market Kahului for donating extra local produce to the Harvest Fest!

And, as always, MAHALO TO OUR WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS who make these special events run smoothly and inspire greater nutrition for our keiki!

– Nio Kindla, Terry Huth, Kathy Becklin, Dania Katz, Eric Ulman, Ray and Laura Van Wagner, Connie Mark, Jordan Lauren Claymore, Wyatt Gouveia, Anthony LaBua, Sierra Knight and Ruby Ayers… you are AWESOME! We couldn’t do this without you!

Wailuku Elementary Students Grow Some Good

21CLC garden group1Grow Some Good is partnering with 21st Century Learning Centers to introduce an after school gardening program at Wailuku Elementary School.

Students learn gardening and sustainability skills that support curriculum benchmarks in science, math, history, language arts, social studies and more.  Projects so far include designing and installing new garden beds, refurbishing and planting existing beds, composting, adding a fruit tree orchard and engineering an irrigation system.

Nutrition classes are also a big part of the program. Our motto: “If they grow it, they’ll eat it.” Students who previously turned their noses up at fresh fruits and vegetables take pride in growing their own and are surprised to discover it actually tastes good too!

Several times a month, students  harvest fruits and veggies and participate in a healthy recipe workshop, using garden-grown ingredients. Students have made salads and dressings, stir fry dishes, healthy snacks and, most popular – green smoothies! See recipe below.21CLC recipe workshop

The garden program will continue through the summer and starts again next year at Wailuku Elementary School.  Mahalo to Wailuku Elementary teacher Lindsay Alexander, 21st Century Learning Centers Adah Askew and Cindy Collins, and Grow Some Good Master Gardener Terry Huth for digging into this program to improve students’ nutrition habits and inspire our next generation of farmers, scientists, teachers and chefs!

Green Smoothie Recipe (serves 15-20 in small cups):

– bunches of parsley, mint and kale (as much as you can pick!)

– one papaya (remove seeds and scoop out insides)

– 2-3 bananas

– 4 cups organic apple juice

– just a few cubes of ice (not too slushy)

Don’t forget… flowing water washing station, salad spinners, flexi cutting mats, butter knives, spoons and a blender for preparing recipes … and 15 – 20 green smoothie maniacs!

Math Matters in the Garden

Measuring Perimeter, Area & Volume / Inspiring Entrepreneurial Minds 

This week, third and fourth graders at Kihei Elementary School and Wailuku Elementary School practiced measuring perimeter, area and volume in the garden to determine quantities of soil and lumber required to build a new raised garden bed and design garden layouts.

The measurements were also used to determine how many plants could be planted in the surface area of the new bed and how a farmer would use these math skills to determine what price to charge for produce.

Lots of fun and a great way to inspire entrepreneurial skills at an early age!

Here’s a link to Kids Gardening resources on a variety of math lessons to incorporate into your school garden programs.

Sept. 22 Workshops: Youth Gardens as Classrooms

Home Gardening Support Network, Maui School Garden Network, Community Work Day and Grow Some Good are pleased to announce a Youth Gardening Workshop to make school garden information and experiences more accessible to teachers, volunteers and others who work with youth-oriented garden programs. Click on the link below for a workshop agenda:
These workshops will feature hands-on activities to help integrate school garden work within all disciplines and give advice on how to maintain and fund school gardens. The workshop day will run from 8:00 am – 1:30 pm with optional post workshop sessions from 2:00-3:00 pm and will include lunch and a food demonstration.
Register by emailing Anne Gachuhi at hgsn@gmail.com or calling (808) 446-2361.  The fee is $35.00.
Scholarships:  Kihei Elementary School and Lokelani Intermediate School teachers, staff and counselors can receive scholarships from Grow Some Good by sending an email with interest to info@GrowSomeGood.org. Please include your name, school, grade level and phone number for follow up in your email.
We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to gain knowledge that will help advance your programs and create more real-life learning opportunities for your students.

Calling All Volunteers: Come Grow With Us!

Planting season is in full swing at Kihei Elementary School Garden. This week, more than 200 students replanted kalo (taro), ‘olena (turmeric), learned pa’i’ai (pounding poi) and Native American “Three Sisters” companion planting traditions.

What else is growing on?
> Gardens of the World (East Asia, Latin America, Mediterranean & more!)
> Green Bean Teepee Tunnels
> Sweet Potato Mounds
> Carrots & Beets Patch
> Salad Bowl Garden
> Pizza Garden

… and we’re just getting started.

Planting is happening every day for the next few weeks until Winter Recess begins (Dec. 19 – Jan. 2).  We need volunteers to help us make this a fun, learning experience for everyone. No gardening experience necessary. Learn as you volunteer!

V
olunteer Hours:
Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
NOTE: All volunteers must register at the school office upon arrival

Where:
Kihei Elementery School
250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

If you’d like to get involved, please email info@KiheiSchoolGardens.org or call 808.269.6300. Please indicate day(s) / time(s) available during weekdays. We’ll match you with a class that fits your schedule and fills your heart!

Mahalo for your kokua!

Kalo Harvest for Makahiki Season

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In celebration of the opening of Makahiki season this month, students from Mr. Little’s fourth grade class harvested the remaining taro (called kalo in Hawaiian). The kalo patch was planted and cultivated by last year’s fourth graders with the help of local kalo farmer Hōkūao Pellegrino. During the harvest, students learned the traditional mo’olelo (story) of Haloa (the “root of life”) and the connection of Hawaiians to this revered food staple, the earth and to all living things. After harvesting the kalo, students learned how to prepare the huli (the leaves were removed and the corm cut from the huli – the top portion of the corm) for planting while volunteers assisted students as they worked to lomi (prepare by massaging & loosening) the soil for the new huli.

By the end of the day, more than 60 new kalo plants were carefully planted by students and volunteers. Students also harvested more than 10 lbs. of ‘olena (turmeric root) which were planted within the kalo patch. Next up, students will learn how to prepare and serve kalo, by pounding poi. This process is called pa’i’ai in Hawaiian. All of this in preparation for a four month long Makahiki Festival and study of the traditional offerings of gratitude to Lono (Hawaiian god of fertility) for a bountiful harvest and the new crops to come!

Link here to a complete slideshow.