Sept 15: Spago Hosts Grow Some Good Fundraiser

Limited Seating, So Make Your Reservation Today!

Please join us Saturday, Sept. 15, at Spago for a very special dinner to benefit Grow Some Good – Educational School Gardens on Maui. Chefs Cameron Lewark (Spago), Christopher Kulis (Capische?) and Nicholas Porreca (Ferraro’s Bar e Ristorante) will co-host a limited seating engagement with 60 guests in the beautiful Spago restaurant, located at the Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea. The four-course dinner will feature school garden-grown ingredients and wine pairings.

For $98 per plate, attendees will have the opportunity to taste cuisine from three of Wailea’s top chefs in one evening. On the menu:

Haiku Tomato, Hana Pohole Ferns, Surfing Goat Cheese 

Garden Radishes, Lemon Grass & Grilled Kula Onion Vinaigrette 

Lobster Consommé, Kona Lobster Tail, Lemongrass

Hamakua Mushroom Lobster Knuckle Ravioli

Kula Corn Puree, Hawaiian chilies 

Mahi Mahi Two Ways

  • Steamed In Ti Leaves

Kula Vegetables, Fragrant Thai Herbs, Green Chili and Cilantro Nam Pla

  • Braised “SZECHUAN” Style

 Shiitake Mushrooms, Gingered-Baby Bok Choy and Jasmine Rice

Warm Chocolate Purse

Decadent Chocolate, Strawberry Sorbet & Caramel Ice Cream

All net proceeds from the fundraiser benefit Grow Some Good projects including school garden installations and maintenance, coordinator/educator positions, school garden mini-grants, curriculum and materials for garden-based learning and nutrition classes. The organization also has received funding support from the County of MauiPrivate Maui Chef Owner/Chef Dan Fiske, Capische? Owner/Chef Brian Etheredge, and Monkeypod Kitchen by MerrimanUlupono InitiativeJohnson Ohana Charitable Foundation and Whole Kids Foundation.

More details about the fundraiser series.

COST: $98 per person

WHERE:
Spago (@Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea)
3900 Wailea Alanui Drive
Wailea, Maui 96753
WHEN:
Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012
Cocktails – 6:30 pm
Dinner – 7 pm
RSVP:
Call Spago reservations at 808.879.2999 (mention Grow Some Good dinner with RSVP)  or make your reservation below.
Mark your calendars for our grand finale Grow Some Good: Wailea Chefs event:
  • Grow Some Good: Wailea Chefs – March 2, 2013 – Outdoor event at Hotel Wailea with students and chefs showcasing the best of school garden recipes.

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lokelani intermediate school grow some good school gardens

Lokelani Rocks! (and Plants!)

lokelani intermediate school grow some good school gardensThe terrace project in the heart of Lokelani Intermediate School is nearly complete, thanks to significant contributions from Goodfellow Brother
s Inc.Hawaiian Cement and numerous other local businesses and community members. Students are planting food garden starts from seeds and preparing native Hawaiian cultural plants for terraces and additional garden spaces throughout the campus.
lokelani intermediate school grow some good school gardens maui hawaii
If you’d like to contribute to the positive growth happening at Lokelani, emailinfo@GrowSomeGood.org for more information. Student and volunteer hours at Lokelani Intermediate School are typically  7:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. weekdays. Some additional afternoon weekday hours and weekends will also be scheduled over the next few months. Email us your availability, and we’ll be in touch soon with upcoming dates! Mahalo!

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Sept. 22 Workshops: Youth Gardens as Classrooms

Home Gardening Support Network, Maui School Garden Network, Community Work Day and Grow Some Good are pleased to announce a Youth Gardening Workshop to make school garden information and experiences more accessible to teachers, volunteers and others who work with youth-oriented garden programs. Click on the link below for a workshop agenda:
These workshops will feature hands-on activities to help integrate school garden work within all disciplines and give advice on how to maintain and fund school gardens. The workshop day will run from 8:00 am – 1:30 pm with optional post workshop sessions from 2:00-3:00 pm and will include lunch and a food demonstration.
Register by emailing Anne Gachuhi at hgsn@gmail.com or calling (808) 446-2361.  The fee is $35.00.
Scholarships:  Kihei Elementary School and Lokelani Intermediate School teachers, staff and counselors can receive scholarships from Grow Some Good by sending an email with interest to info@GrowSomeGood.org. Please include your name, school, grade level and phone number for follow up in your email.
We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to gain knowledge that will help advance your programs and create more real-life learning opportunities for your students.
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Work & Learn Days – 2nd Saturdays & 3rd Thursdays + Lokelani May 4

Mark your calendars for April/May Work & Learn Days!

  • “Second Saturday”

Saturday, April 13

8:30 a.m. – Noon

Where:

Kihei Elementary School

250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

  • “Third Thursday”

Thursday, April 18

2 p.m. – 5 p.m. Garden care

Where:

Kihei Elementary School

250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

  • Lokelani Ohana All Campus Work & Learn Day – May 4

Saturday, May 4

8 a.m. – Noon

Join Lokelani teachers, students and volunteers for an all campus Work & Learn Day. We’ll be refurbishing garden beds and planting in new garden areas, including the new Hawaiian terrace project in the heart of campus.

Where: 

Lokelani Intermediate School

1401 Liloa Drive

Kihei, HI 96753

  • “Second Saturday” – May

Saturday, May 11

8:30 a.m. – Noon

Noon – 1 p.m.  Bokashi Workshop with Maui Bokashi‘s Jenna Leilani Tallman.

Learn to easily transform food scraps into rich compost with effective microorganisms & Bokashi.

Where:

Kihei Elementary School

250 E Lipoa St  Kihei, HI 96753

 

Join us every “Second Saturday” morning and “Third Thursday” afternoon at Kihei Elementary School Garden as we plant new garden starts from seed, build bamboo trellises and vertical gardens, harvest heirloom produce, prep soil for replanting, turn compost, weed & mulch pathways, paint garden signs and more.


Share the Harvest
& Starts
Come for gardening care, inspirations and share in the bounty.  Organic and heirloom garden plant starts available to help get your own back yard gardens started.

Ask the Gardeners
Grow Some Good volunteers and certified Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions about bugs, plant disease issues and tips on growing an organic garden in Kihei.

Our garden care days are always a lot of fun and a great way to learn about organic gardening from people in the neighborhood. Join us for all or part of the day. Water and light refreshments will be provided.

If you have questions in advance, please email info@GrowSomeGood.org, call 808.269.6300 or visit our Volunteer PageSee you there!

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Soil Building with Cover Crops

The hottest summer months in Kihei are tough on most garden plants, but it’s a great time to introduce cover crops for improving soil health and preparing for the next planting season. These crops also serve as great tools to teach students about nitrogen and its role in the life cycle.

All plants need nitrogen to make amino acids, proteins and DNA. Approximately 80 percent of the air surrounding the earth is nitrogen gas. However, nitrogen in gas form is not usable by most plants. First, nitrogen needs to be converted from its atmospheric gas form to ammonium compounds to become available to plants. To achieve this, many organic farmers use nitrogen-fixing cover crops. Cover crop benefits and tips include:

Boosting Soil Fertility & Nitrogen Fixing

Cover crops, also known as green manures, recycle nutrients and add organic matter to the soil.  The nutrients are absorbed and stored inside plants. When nutrients are needed for the next crop, the old plants are dug into the soil or used as mulch on top of the soil. We always explain to students, “old plants make food for new plants.”

Legumes – such as alfalfa, peas, beans, clover and vetch – are particularly beneficial to replenish nitrogen available to plants. During the process, called “nitrogen fixing,” rhizobial bacteria take residence in root nodules of legumes and convert biologically unavailable atmospheric nitrogen gas to a plant-available ammonium compound.

Inoculating Seeds for Better Nitrogen Fixing

There are multiple strains of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, and each is specific to a certain type of legume. For instance, the rhizobia strain associated with vetch will also work with peas, but not alfalfa. When legumes are inoculated with the proper strain of rhizobial bacteria, they produce large, pink nodules on the roots of the host plant. The pinkish color indicates the presence of a hemoglobin-like molecule that is necessary for nitrogen fixation to occur.

Rhizobia live naturally in the soil. However, the strains already present may not always be compatible for your cover crop or in the amount necessary for effective nitrogen fixation. To increase the odds, many gardeners inoculate their cover crop seeds by lightly dusting them with the appropriate rhizobial bacteria strains prior to planting. Rhizobial bacteria powder may be found in or near the seed section at your local nursery. Check the label to ensure the inoculant matches your cover crop seed of choice. We’ve had difficulty finding inoculant on store shelves on Maui, so ordering online is the best option here. Peaceful Valley has a great selection of seed inoculants with instructions on proper use of each strain.

Improving Soil Structure & Habitat

Cover crops strengthen soil structure, letting more air into the soil, improving drainage, maintaining viable living space for beneficial microorganisms and insects. Cover crops can also help the sandy soils found in Kihei hold more water. While some cover crops are drought resistant, beneficial bacteria generally fare better with moisture.

Preventing Soil Erosion and Compaction

Cover crops help prevent soil from being carried away by wind and rain. The roots penetrate the soil and hold it in place. Having plants constantly growing in your gardening spaces also gives a visual cue to help deter kids from marching through and compacting the soil.

Controlling Weeds

Bare soil can become quickly overgrown with weeds, which can be difficult to remove once they’ve become established. A good ground cover can prevent weeds from growing by competing for nutrients, space and light.

Want to learn more? You’re invited to help us plant new cover crops and learn hands-on how to improve nitrogen availability for healthy new garden plants. Attend our upcoming Work & Learn Days or email info@GrowSomeGood.org for more information on participating in classes with Kihei Elementary & Lokelani Intermediate students.

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Seaweed Lesson and Use in the Garden

The following is a synopsis of seaweed lessons and materials used for YMCA classes (mixed ages).

Goal: Give students a understanding of the value of seaweed and it’s importance in our Hawaiian economy and culture.
Time: 30 minutes

Basic Plan:

1) Gather students in circle.  Ask them to share what they know about seaweed or ask them to describe seaweed.  Describe/ask about the 3 words: Seaweed,  Limu (Hawaiian name for seaweed) and Algae (botanical name for seaweed).

2) Ask them when they last used a seaweed product? What if I told you that I bet that all of you put seaweed in your mouth this morning?   Seaweed is a key ingredient in toothpaste!

3) Go over the 3 names that you’ll find in common products  that are actually seaweed.   See this lesson for more information.   Kids will try to tell you that seaweed is not in their chocolate or Strawberry Ice Cream! Seaweeds are high in nutrients and minerals. They are used as a biofuel and have some amazing properties that are used in medicines and vitamins.

4) Talk about how seaweed is different from other plants.   What does it need to grow (sunlight, nutrients, water)?  Talk about how it doesn’t get nutrients from the rocks, sand but some seaweeds establish a “holdfast” to keep them from floating away.  But some seaweeds do just float in the water.   Show examples of how some seaweed has “bladder balls” (THEY POP REALLY LOUD!)  that provides buoyancy so the plant grows up toward the surface.

5) Describe the 3 basic colors of seaweed – Green, Brown and Red.  Describe the different sizes and shapes.  Some seaweed is too small to see and some grows over 100 feet tall.  Seaweeds in Hawaii can grow up to 12 inches per week although that is not normal.  The large kelp beds of California can grow up to 2 feet a day!  They cut it weekly to make fertilizers.


6) Show the students how we are going to rinse the seaweed that was collected from the beach.  Remind them that there may be small snails in the seaweed.  We rinse the seaweed to remove the salt before we will put in the garden. Have students take a handful and rinse it,  dunk it again to rinse and put on a screen.

7) Have the kids sort through the seaweed on the screen identifying as many different forms of seaweed as they can. Put the excess seaweed in the buckets for the last step.

8) As they find a new seaweed, have them place it in a container on the table. Observe how the seaweed changes as it it placed in water. Some look like slime but become beautiful underwater. Kids will stuff the bottles if you let them so encourage them to put in just enough to clearly see and identify.

9) If you have older kids and/or more time, have the kids go through the additional resources and identify the different seaweeds. Is it alien, endemic or unknown. Is it edible?

10) Have the students take the buckets of seaweed and toss them around the garden adding great minerals and fertilizer!

Answers to Tough Questions: (Beware)

  • Can I take this seaweed home?  No – Your mom won’t want stinky seaweed!  or   Sure, after we spread it on the garden soil, you can come back with your mom or dad and take home whatever you want.
  • Can I eat this seaweed?  No – even if it is edible, we do not have the correct cleaning facilities for seaweed.
  • Is this a piece of coral? Yes, dead coral is often used by seaweed as a holdfast.  When waves are strong it gets washed up to the beach.  Did you know that coral is actually a colony of small animals (polyps) and has a symbiotic relationship with a special algae (seaweed) called zooxanthellae.  If the algae dies, so does the coral.  This is often referred to as coral bleaching because the coral will turn white.
  • Is this a new seaweed? There is always at least one child who will keep bringing the same type of seaweed up and asking this.  Ask them to describe the color, size and texture of the leaves and make them conclude that it is the same as the last one they brought up.
  • Do fish eat seaweed?  Yes, but not all fish.  Many fish hide in seaweed.  Some even change colors so they are very hard to see when in their favorite seaweed.  Turtles also eat seaweed as well as many crabs, star fish,  and other sea animals.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Id of Hawaii Seaweeds: http://www.hawaii.edu/reefalgae/natives/sgfieldguide.htm

Id of Edible Limu in Hawaii: http://www.hawaii.edu/reefalgae/publications/ediblelimu/

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Maui Realtor Kathy Becklin Talks about Grow Some Good

Each week, The Maui News Kahiau column features a local REALTOR who is giving back to the community. Our own Maui Realtor Kathy Becklin was featured on 6/2/2012 with the amazing Grow Some Good project.  Another friend, Karen Williamson, who has volunteered in the garden referred Kathy because she knows what a fabulous program it is!   Here’s the article  (click on it to view the article and learn more about Kathy.)

Kathy can be reached at 808-344-0469 or visit her website TheMauiMinute.com.

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April 28 “Helping Hands Day” at Lokelani School

On Saturday, April 28, Community Work Day Program is teaming with Mormon Church, Department of Health, Americorps volunteers and other community organizations for an island-wide school garden “Helping Hands Day.” Organizers expect to gather 50-100 volunteers at 13 sites for a total of 1,000 volunteers working in gardens across Molokai, Lanai, and Maui.

Projects at Lokelani Intermediate School include: cleaning up the front entrance to the campus, spreading compost and mulch, planting around portables and other campus locations, and preparing garden spaces for curriculum-based student projects.

Lokelani “Helping Hands Day”
Saturday, April 28
8 a.m. – 12 noonLokelani Intermediate School
1401 Liloa Drive, Kihei, HI 96753For more information, contact Lauren at Community Work Day Program: 808.877.2524
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Outrigger Pizza Teaches Kids Art and Science of Pizza Dough

The Outrigger Pizza Company is a favorite lunch spot in Kihei, Maui (Azeka Shopping Center Mauka parking lot), so we were thrilled when co-founder and president Eric Mitchell agreed to spend three full days working with Wailea chefs preparing pizzas in his mobile wood burning oven. More than 800 K-5 grade students at Kihei Elementary School co-created pizza recipes including marinara, pesto or herb infused olive oil, topped with fresh garden greens and herbs, red creole onion, carrots, tomato, broccoli and zucchini – all veggies that are grown in the school garden.

Chef Eric brought an artisan kiawe wood burning clay oven on wheels, made all the dough for the entire event, made extra  pizzas for delivery to classes who couldn’t attend and kept the oven stoked for a special after school party for YMCA A+ students.  While the kids watched him flip dough in the air, he explained the science behind yeast and how beneficial bacteria burp when eating flour to make tiny air pockets in the crust. “Ewww!!!” a few screeched, then Eric explained the benefits of good bacteria to keep digestion healthy. Inspired by their discovery, kids artfully spread the sauce in circles, arranged herbs and sprinkled with cheese, then patiently waited – only 90 seconds before pizzas emerged from the kiawe oven piping hot. They talked story and called out their slices and took in the aroma while waiting a few more moments to cool. Students devoured, studied and savored the garden pies while talking about their favorite ingredients…and their next recipe adventure!

Mahalo nui loa to Eric, all the chefs and volunteers for inspiring our keiki to grow, harvest, prepare and eat their own amazing vegetables.

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Wailea Chefs Grow Some Good

 

capische il teatro chef christopher kulisWe are so fortunate to have our chefs on Maui! And we have some great news to share:  Four of Wailea’s premiere chefs are combining their talents, time and resources to support the school garden movement on Maui. Chefs Brian Etheredge and Christopher Kulis of Capische? and Il Teatro are teaming up with Four Season’s Maui at Wailea Chefs Cameron Lewark of Spago and Nicholas Porreca of Ferraro’s to host a series of four fundraisers, called ‘Grow Some Good: Wailea Chefs.’  Taking place May 2012 through early 2013, the series will showcase recipes co-created with students and ingredients grown at Kihei Elementary School and Lokelani Intermediate School gardens.

All net proceeds from thekihei elementary school garden harvest party 2012 fundraisers benefit Grow Some Good projects including school garden installations and maintenance, coordinator/educator positions, school garden mini-grants, curriculum and materials for garden-based learning and nutrition classes. The organization also has received funding support from the County of Maui, Private Maui Chef Owner/Chef Dan Fiske, Capische? Owner/Chef Brian Etheredge, and Monkeypod Kitchen by Merriman.

Event series includes:

  • Grow Some Good: Ferraro’s – May 19, 2012 – Ferraro’s private, invitation-only dinner for 25 guests.
  • Grow Some Good: Capische? – July 20, 2012 – Capische? dinner for 40 guests.
  • Grow Some Good: Spago – Sept. 15, 2012 – Spago dinner for 60 guests.
  • Maui Chefs Grow Some Good – March 2, 2013 outdoor event at Hotel Wailea with students and chefs showcasing the best of school garden recipes. For tickets, visit http://growsomegood.org/events/.

To kick off the serieKihei Elementary School harvest party 2012 grow some goods, Wailea chefs shared the art and science of good food with more than 800 students and in nearly a quarter-acre of garden space in the heart of the Kihei Elementary School campus.  Students harvested and prepared ingredients from the Pizza Garden and Gardens of the World to make wood-fired pizza in a mobile pizza oven supplied by Outrigger Pizza, then stir-fry veggies for Asian vegggie wraps. Student grown ingredients included eggplant, okra, carrots, tomatoes, zucchini, red creole onions, green onions, basil, bok choy, oregano and thyme. Super delicious!  Then students finished their day sipping lilikoi lemonade with fresh berries. Special thanks to Akamai Pumping for donating foot pump hand washing stations — the most fun we’ve ever seen kids have washing their hands!

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